TANGERINE JELLY

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 05-01-2016

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I was complaining in the last garden blog about the abundance of “root stock tangerines” this year.  None of the other citrus did anything after the cold weather we had last winter but the little semisweet, seedy tangerines on the five volunteer root stock trees did really well.  With over 1000 fruit on the trees, I decided that there was no way that all the fruit could be consumed before they fell to the ground and rotted.  I’ve been eating 4 or more a day but that is not making a dent.

Root stock tangerines

Root stock tangerines

 

what you need for jelly making

what you need for jelly making

 

This evening I picked 62 tangerines and brought them inside.  They are pretty little things and they filled the bucket I had.

tangerines

tangerines

Once inside, I peeled them.  The aroma was spectacular.  Nothing smells as good or like a tangerine.

tangerine peel

tangerine peel

 

peeled

peeled

I placed the peeled fruit into a blender (ninja type but any blender will do) and miraculously turned them into juice.

ready to juice

ready to juice

Well juice, pulp and 10 thousand seeds.  After straining the pulp and seeds away, I had a semisweet tangerine juice.

mmmm seeds and pulp

mmmm seeds and pulp

To this I added 12 cups of sugar and then discovered that I had sweet tangerine juice.  I added two packets of Sure Jell (pectin) and cooked for one hour until I got thickening on the metal spoon I used to stir the cooking juice.

rolling boil

rolling boil

I then placed the sanitized jars next to the pot and filled them with the hot (very hot) tangerine  juice.

jars at the ready

jars at the ready

I placed the lids on the jars and put them all on the counter.  I got 12- 1/2 pint jars, two pint jars and a single quart jar.

When I make jelly, there is no guarantee that it will not be syrup for pancakes.  It is difficult to get it to set up as jelly is supposed to do.  I have an assortment of sweet syrups in my pantry.  However, this time it worked.  All the jars set up and made jelly.  I mean really good jelly.  The semisweet nature of the tangerines gave the jelly a marmalade tangerine flavor which I have never encountered before.  Very very good.

 

lots of jelly

lots of jelly

So here is the deal.   If you live close to the garden (Beaufort, SC) and want to pick free semisweet, seedy tangerines for jelly making, please come.  Email me at seaislandman@islc.net and I will tell you how to get here and help you pick.    Really!  Come help me save the tangerines.

Comments (6)

Gordon this is so interesting to me. I wish I could smell and taste it! I love orange marmalde but I like it with lots of rind in it. I wanted to make some recently but we do not have access to Seville oranges which it is traditionally made with and I did not investigate to see what else would work. If we were closer I would certainly come get some from you and I think I would try putting in some rind.. I know you will enjoy your jelly.. congratulations on discovering that.

Hi Pat:
I will give you a jar of the tangerine jelly when you and Tommy come to the Wisteria Soiree. It is very good but I can’t eat it because it has lots of sugar in it. Same situation with the honey my bees make. The tangerine jelly is tart like a marmalade even without any rind.

I lived on the base near Beaufort many years ago. Wish I were closer because I’d take you up on the offer and be making jelly too. Sounds yummy and is beautiful in the jars. Glad you were able to use them. Just wondering if you did a water bath?

Hi Lisa:

If you are asking whether I sterilized the jars in boiling water before filling them – I did. I grew up in Myrtle Beach, SC but discovered Beaufort while stationed here at Parris Island.

Gordon and Glenda. Hello
The tangerine entry is interesting and beautiful. I’ll come visit when the tangerines r ripe next time. Helen

We are looking forward to your arrival. Our winter has been very mild so I am expecting a bumper crop of all the citrus (navals, juice oranges, pink and regular grapefruit, Myer’s lemons, key limes, kumquats, tangerines, mandarins and several other little sour things). Things start to ripen the latter part of November and stay on the trees through January and later.

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