SPRING APPROACHES AND OUR NEW RAISED BEDS NEAR COMPLETION

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 20-01-2013

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I decided that after my knee replacement that I needed to find a way that would allow me to work in the garden from my new garden tractor.  That is a tractor seat on pneumatic tires that I can drag around while sitting on it.  It works great but the original raised beds are still a little low and force me to bend more than I want.  Planting and weeding activities still mean pain in the back so a higher raised bed is the answer.  This will also allow us to work on the soil to improve it.  This process of conversion will take several years but stage one is complete except for filling each of the four beds with soil.   A gargantuan undertaking.  Davis and I have taken on the largest bed.  A 4′ x 8′ x 24″ monstrosity that has swallowed the first 7 wheel barrow loads of dirt hauled by Davis, then 4 more today by me and when I went back tonight I saw where Davis had returned and carried another load.  I plan to carry 7 more tomorrow which should bring it to a level where we can add the 6 bags of Miracle Grow to top it off.  Then we will have two 4′ x 8′ x 18 ” beds and one 4′ x 4′ x 8″ bed to fill.

 

4' x 8' x 24' raised bed "The Monster"

 

The other three beds.

 

I had to re-locate a large asparagus plant that was growing where one of the new beds is built.  This was the proverbial extra plant left over when an order comes in and is planted in any open space.  Of course it grew and thrived as well or better than the plants in the asparagus bed.  I divided it into 8 large root balls and filled out the asparagus bed so I am hopeful that this year will see a bumper crop.

 

We have an uninvited visitor to our garden.  I think it is an opossum but I have been unable to trap it.  Here is a photograph of the damage it has done to our cabbage.

 

Cabbage damage

 

Any hints on what the culprit is?

 

I’ve also set up two seedling stations.  One is outside under the shed by the garden where we will harden off the seedlings before planting in the garden.

 

Hardening off station.

 

And the other is under the house where we can control the temperature and sprout the seeds.  We can grow many varieties that are not available to us except via sprouting them ourselves.  It also allows us to graft our tomato plants for increased productivity and resistance to viral pest (Check out grafting tomatoes on u-tube.  It will change the way you grow tomatoes.)

 

One of two light stands.

 

Our mild Winter is making me hopeful that we will have an early Spring.  The red maple are already showing red blooms, the bees are flying like mad and we have yet to have a frost.  All this means that we will probably have a hard freeze in March.  I will not take the seedlings out to the garden until I am sure that the danger of frost has passed.  Those are famous last words.

Who knows, we might even have the new raised beds filled by then.

I will try to have a list of the vegetables we plan to grow this Spring for the next blog.

GORDON

Comments (4)

I think it might be a rabbit eating the cabbage. I have seen a couple around the property. Maybe bait the have a heart trap with something a rabbit would like. A carrot or something. Just a thought.

I have to agree with Cam.Can you blame them,that is Good Looking cabbage.The hint was in one of the previous pictures showing a cage trap.I’m sure the Rabbits thanked you.They probably left you little gifts throughout the garden.

NOT A RABBIT. NO LITTLE ROUND GIFTS LEFT ANYWHERE. I’VE BAITED WITH PEANUT BUTTER WHICH ALWAYS GETS THE RACCOON AND OPOSSUM BUT NOTHING THIS TIME. IT HAS TO CLIMB OVER OR CRAWL THROUGH THE 2X4 WIRE FENCE. THAT MAKES IT A VERY SMALL RABBIT. AN ARMADILLO WOULD DIG UNDER THE FENCE BUT THERE IS NO EVIDENCE THAT IT HAS BEEN BREACHED. NO SKUNKS IN THE AREA. I’M RUNNING OUT OF POSSIBILITIES….IS IT YOU CAM? ARE YOU SAMPLING THE CABBAGE?

Possibly a bird??

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