GARDEN PROGRESS CONTINUES

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 17-11-2011

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I am writing this blog as a fall cold front moves through and experiencing the lightning and thunder that accompanies these seasonal changes.   I was hoping for substantial rain but it appears that this storm has more bite than substance.  It is raining but not as much as the garden needs.  I have been hand watering every day to encourage the fall growth so as to generate a late season crop from many of our plantings.  I have learned that a 30 second drenching of a plant from the nozzle (set at shower) is adequate.  Anything less is just a waste of time as the water never gets down to the roots.

Malimar Spinach

OUR NEW PLANTING OF MALIMAR SPINACH NEXT TO THE GARDEN FENCE.

Things continue to grow, although slowly, but if we are lucky, we will get a few crops in before the frost.  If we are really lucky, we will not get a frost this winter.  This has happened several times in the last 6 years.  We are currently enjoying the Malimar Spinach and the Broccoli has matured.  In fact, I picked the first two heads today as they were starting to flower.  We have a dozen more ready to pass their prime so it is time to pick.  This first harvest gives us large four and five inch heads but the smaller side shoots continue for a month and are as delicious or better than the first picking.  When I was harvesting the Broccoli this evening I noticed a couple honey bees visiting several of the yellow flowers that had opened today.  We have not had honey bees for years here so I am sure that they came from the swarm that abandoned our top bar hive last spring.  I am glad they have made it.  I have not spoken to Peggy about ordering another swarm for the spring but I am sure it is time to do so.

Broccoli

BEFORE THE FIRST PICKING.

Not everything goes as planned.  We put in a late planting of winter squash in case we had a mild winter and the plants have come up and are starting to bloom despite a nasty infestation of powdery mildew.  We had a lot of rain early in their growth and despite the current “drought”, the mildew took hold.  I hate to use chemicals so we will just have to wait and see what evolves.  Does anyone know how to address this problem without chemicals?

Powdery mildew on squash

POWDERY MILDEW ON THE WINTER SQUASH.

 

Female squash blooms

SQUASH IS MAKING DISPITE THE POWDERY MILDEW.

 

Terry and I completed the construction of the raised beds that will be our tomato beds next summer.  I installed them and planted some of my daylily hybrids around the edges.  The tomatoes (27 plants) will go down the middle.  I have to layer in some aged compost at each tomato site to prepare it for a “bountiful crop”.  This will be one of our main rotating beds in the coming years.  Mellons last year, tomatoes this year and a root crop next year.

New tomato bed with daylilies

NEW 45 ft TOMATO BED WITH DAYLILIES AT THE EDGES (note the citrus whip in the middle and the pear tree at the other end - a plum tree borders the near side).

 

The strawberry bed is under construction as is the fig hedge.  More to come about these later.

A few more photos of our fall efforts.

Young turnips

YOUNG TURNIPS

 

Spring mix greens

SPRING MIX GREENS - oh so good!

 

Peas

EDABLE POD PEAS ARE ALMOST READY TO START BLOOMING.

 

Greens

MORE GREENS with last years potato sprouts.

 

Things to do in November include a thorough cleaning of the debris in the garden to reduce the spore and egg count of those organisms which will bite us in the spring.  We should also harvest the Jerusalem Artichokes and plant them out for next years crop.  It is time to plant our garlic as well as overwintering varieties of broad beans.  Other than pruning our fruit trees (not the plums) and  turning the manure into the soil, there is not much else to do.

It is now time to read the catalogs.

GORDON

Comments (3)

Hey Gordon!

You might try a solution of milk and water on your powdery mildew. Some swear by a 50/50 solution, some say 1 part milk to 9 parts water. You might experiment with something in between. If it’s bad, you might lean toward the higher concentration of milk. Doesn’t seem to matter whether it’s whole milk, 2% or skim. Hope it works for you!

-Ray

From what I have read finding the least toxic fungicide is the best treatment for the squash. Although there is a time window. Said Spraying at first detection was important.

A very merry Christmas Gordon, to you, to Glenda and to your grandson. It was a joy and privilege to meet up with you this summer and my mother Pat, joins me, Suzanne, Robert and Alice in wishing you all a fruitful and abundant 2012.

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