TANGERINE JELLY

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 05-01-2016

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I was complaining in the last garden blog about the abundance of “root stock tangerines” this year.  None of the other citrus did anything after the cold weather we had last winter but the little semisweet, seedy tangerines on the five volunteer root stock trees did really well.  With over 1000 fruit on the trees, I decided that there was no way that all the fruit could be consumed before they fell to the ground and rotted.  I’ve been eating 4 or more a day but that is not making a dent.

Root stock tangerines

Root stock tangerines

 

what you need for jelly making

what you need for jelly making

 

This evening I picked 62 tangerines and brought them inside.  They are pretty little things and they filled the bucket I had.

tangerines

tangerines

Once inside, I peeled them.  The aroma was spectacular.  Nothing smells as good or like a tangerine.

tangerine peel

tangerine peel

 

peeled

peeled

I placed the peeled fruit into a blender (ninja type but any blender will do) and miraculously turned them into juice.

ready to juice

ready to juice

Well juice, pulp and 10 thousand seeds.  After straining the pulp and seeds away, I had a semisweet tangerine juice.

mmmm seeds and pulp

mmmm seeds and pulp

To this I added 12 cups of sugar and then discovered that I had sweet tangerine juice.  I added two packets of Sure Jell (pectin) and cooked for one hour until I got thickening on the metal spoon I used to stir the cooking juice.

rolling boil

rolling boil

I then placed the sanitized jars next to the pot and filled them with the hot (very hot) tangerine  juice.

jars at the ready

jars at the ready

I placed the lids on the jars and put them all on the counter.  I got 12- 1/2 pint jars, two pint jars and a single quart jar.

When I make jelly, there is no guarantee that it will not be syrup for pancakes.  It is difficult to get it to set up as jelly is supposed to do.  I have an assortment of sweet syrups in my pantry.  However, this time it worked.  All the jars set up and made jelly.  I mean really good jelly.  The semisweet nature of the tangerines gave the jelly a marmalade tangerine flavor which I have never encountered before.  Very very good.

 

lots of jelly

lots of jelly

So here is the deal.   If you live close to the garden (Beaufort, SC) and want to pick free semisweet, seedy tangerines for jelly making, please come.  Email me at seaislandman@islc.net and I will tell you how to get here and help you pick.    Really!  Come help me save the tangerines.

CHRISTMAS DAY IN THE GARDEN

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 25-12-2015

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Waiting for Spring

Waiting for Spring

 

I can hardly call our vegetable garden a garden this Christmas.  We have been taught that Mother Nature has her way when it is set by El Nino.  Our late summer plantings were all beat down by the overwhelming rains.  After three re-plantings,  I quit.

Green house under construction

Green house under construction

I am building a green house which will be attached to the ground level of my home and I plan to start the spring seedlings as soon as my son and I finish building it.  In the meantime,   I will have to be content with my memories  from the past and those wonderful blooms that exist in this warm weather we are enjoying.  Last winter was very cold again and as the year before, we got very few citrus  —  except for the tangerines that were produced by the root stock trees that had come up around the original tangerine tree.

Root stock tangerines

Root stock tangerines

Tangerines - thousands of Tangerines

Tangerines – thousands of Tangerines

They are a smaller fruit and very seedy and certainly not as sweet as the original tree but as the winter comes on, they sweeten a little so as to be eatable.  In fact, I have developed a preference for them over the sweeter originals.  The trees are bending over and hugging the ground with their burden of fruit.  There is no way I will be able to eat, give away or convert to marmalade and jelly the volume that these little gems have presented.  I will hate to see them fall to the ground in march but there is little I can do.   If they were apples I could give some to the horses but they will have nothing to do with them.  I can only hope that I will have this problem with the other varieties that the garden grows next year.

Our warm weather has also allowed many of the flowering plants to give a great winter display.  My Jean-Pierre (or Jean-Phillip or whatever) rose is in full bloom again for the 4th time this year.

Old world French rose

Old world French rose

The camellias are starting and promise to really show well this winter

Camillia

Camillia

The bloom to come.

The bloom to come.

Camillia

Camillia

and I have the ever-spreading seedless morning glory blooming and invading every corner of my English garden.  Word of warning, Don’t allow the beauty of this flower convince you to plant it.

Enjoy this flower online and not in your garden.

Enjoy this flower online and not in your garden.

I guarantee that you will regret that you did.  I was warned but disregarded the advice and can only advance it to you as it is too late for my garden (I am at war).

 

Christmas turkey needs carving so I will stop.

 

Merry Christmas to you all.

 

Gordon

 

Horses eating their Christmas dinner.

Horses eating their Christmas dinner.

 

 

RAIN! RAIN! AND MORE RAIN!

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 09-10-2015

 

OUR GARDEN

I can’t claim to have had the most rain as the 25 inches the central part of South Carolina received dwarfs the 6 inches we received in Beaufort but I can tell you that our garden looks very poor as most of the fall plantings have been beaten down and will require replanting.  This is disheartening as it is late and many plants will not have time to set up and produce before the cold weather arrives.   Such is gardening and the weather. We have had to forego two years of citrus production due to the cold and now we will miss much of our wonderful fall garden due to the excessive rain.  I will not post images of what is left of our garden but will hope that we rebound before the next blog so I can brag.

I do want to describe a method I have used this fall in growing some very attractive seedlings.  Like all gardeners, I want to plant a little of everything and thus end up purchasing plants six to nine at a time in small ready packs from Lowe’s or other garden centers.  This can become expensive when one grows five varieties of collards, 3 kinds of Swiss Chard, 4 different loose leaf lettuce – you get the idea.  so I am growing my own.  I find that buying an ounce of seed for each variety is very affordable (especially when the extra can be stored in Ziploc bags and frozen for use the next couple years).  My  method is very simple:  I take my used plastic solo cups and drill 4 holes in the bottom (you can drill ten cups at a time with an electric drill).  I then insert a peat pot inside the cup.  Next comes the potting soil (usually Miracle Grow) and then I place one or two seeds into the pot.  Water and stand back.  I grow mine outside on a raised table during the warm seasons and inside under lights and over heat when it is cold.  No weeds, no rabbits, no deer!  When the seedlings are tall enough to be transplanted, I take them to the garden and remove the peat pot from the solo cup and plant the seedling into the garden soil.  The top ridge of the peat pot discourages the cut worms (although some adventurous climbers do find the stems) and the roots are not disturbed and keep on growing into the new soil.  The plants get a good head start and do better than the seedlings I purchase and have to transplant out of the ready packs where the root systems seem to always hold onto the plastic sides or grow over into the adjacent seedlings space and become shredded or at the very least disturbed.    I first used this method to sprout my daylily hybrid seeds which proved very successful and made it very easy to keep tract of the ancestry of each seedling as each seedling grew in a separate pot.

 

WARNING!  DO NOT BUY FROM THE WILLIS ORCHARDS COMPANY IN  CARTERSVILLE,   GEORGIA !

Now that I have talked about our garden, let me get on my soap box.  As many of you know, I am a biologist, a master gardener, and after having a garden for the majority of my 71 years, I have learned a lot about growing things.  One might say that I seldom kill a plant.  However, when I receive a plant I ordered on the internet that is already dead, there is not much I can do.  This is exactly what occurred when I ordered a Desirable Pecan Tree from the Willis Orchards Co. (www.willisorchards.com) in 2014.  I paid $24.99 plus $19.00 shipping for the tree.  I expected to get a living tree for my $44.00.  I also expected the Willis Orchard Co. to honor their friendly guarantee as stated on their webpage:

You may have heard horror stories about purchasing from other companies that treat their customers with disrespect and give them the proverbial “run around” when trying to correct an error that has been made. You need not worry about this from Willis Orchard Company, this will not be the case in the unlikely event that an error or other problem occurs. We are kindhearted and reasonable people who are willing to work out issues, not compound them.

I emailed The Willis Orchard Co. and told them what had happened.  I received a response from Brandi Wright wherein she told me that there were three processes by which I could get a replacement.  None of the processes, however,  included The Willis Orchard Co. paying the additional $19.00 shipping charge.  Now $19.00 is not an insurmountable charge but the failure of the Willis Co. to satisfy one of their customers who has a valid claim with them is a problem.  I should not be required to pay double shipping for a plant that arrived dead.   They have an obligation to satisfy their customers without the run around, distrust (disrespect) and the horror stories as mentioned on their website.

I followed up my email with a google search of The Willis Orchard Co.  I discovered some very disturbing facts.  There seems to be a plethora of dissatisfied past customers having done business with The Willis Orchard Company.  One report comes from a very reputable online plant site (Davids Garden) where it is stated that as many as 50% of those doing business with this company were dissatisfied.

In all fairness, I must admit that I have done business with Willis before and never had occasion to make a claim but I have also done business with many of their competing nurseries online and never had difficulty getting a replacement when needed without paying for a second shipping charge.

I find it startling that this company would have such a policy.  At any rate – BEWARE!  Although their plants are fine, their business plan is very poor.

 

Gordon

THE WILD CHANTERELLES

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 12-09-2015

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GARDEN CHECK-IN

Wow!  What a summer.  Hot and wet – very wet.  I don’t think I have seen anything wilt all summer except me.  The tomatoes, cucumbers, cabbage, rape, collards all did well but have finished now but the okra and sweet peppers (both bell and banana) are still setting fruit and looking good.  They should continue until frost.  The corn grew to 8 feet (supposed to go to five) but did not produce a lot of ears – still worth growing.  The carrots were shaded out by the peppers because I tried to double crop and protect the carrots from the killing sun .   I over did it.

I am starting the seeds for the fall garden and will plant them in the garden in a week or two.  Lots of green crops like several lettuce varieties, rape, kale, beets, collards, broccoli, Swiss chard, carrots, etc.

FALL SEEDLINGS

FALL SEEDLINGS

 

Will also try a sugar pea and a late tomato variety.  The Jerusalem artichokes are 9 feet tall and blooming (it is a sunflower with an edible root that is a good potato replacement for those avoiding a heavy starch diet – diabetics).  The many heavy rain storms that we have had this summer has beaten the plants down to a horizontal position but I think they are none the worse for their condition.  I may try to extend our fall garden with a cover to protect it from the frost.

The little scarlet flower vine that somehow volunteered in the fence line has about taken over half of the garden.  Don’t intentionally plant this vine as it is impossible to control.  I will spend many hours in the garden doing what I least enjoy about gardening – weeding!  After which I will add more composted horse manure before setting the fall garden.

 

WILD CHANTERELLES  

This is a continuation of a previous post about Chanterelle mushrooms.      Our garden is in the middle of an old 1750s Indigo plantation on North Lady’s Island in Beaufort, South Carolina.  Shortly after purchasing the property, I noticed the forest floor was covered in apricot colored mushrooms.  Wild mushrooms were not my area of expertise and I have always stayed away from using them in anything I ate.  All mushrooms are poisonous aren’t they?

CHANTERELLS ON FOREST FLOOR

CHANTERELLS ON FOREST FLOOR

 

About 20 years ago,  I observed three young women in my forest excitedly running around harvesting the mushrooms.  I stopped and asked what they were doing (in my forest).  They told me in heavy french accents that they were visiting a friend in the adjacent retirement development and were picking the Chanterelles – their favorite mushroom which were almost gone in Europe because of over harvesting by those who consumed them.  They each had a basket holding over a gallon of mushrooms which were destined to be cleaned and frozen for later use.  They explained that there was only one other mushroom (a poisonous one) that looked similar to the Chanterelle and it could be differentiated because it had true gills as to the Chantrelles false gills.   Well this was a clue that I could follow so I researched the literature and found that they were correct and not about to die an unpleasant death.  I have since become an avid consumer of this wonderful mushroom.  It blooms from the earth following ever heavy rain during the Summer and would fill a pickup truck or more.

CHANTERELLES IN THE BASKET

CHANTERELLES IN THE BASKET

 

I take only what I can eat and leave the rest to deposit their spores throughout the forest.  I recently found them dried in a Whole Earth Food store at $60.00 a pound and twice that as fresh succulent mushrooms.  Many fine gourmet chefs covet them for their delicate flavor, texture and color which they add to their signature dishes.  I like mine sauteed in butter with a light touch of garlic as the flavor is very delicate.  The color is retained and the texture (much like a portabella) is perfect when eaten alone or mixed with an egg dish, added to pasta or to a hamburger stuffing.  Best of all – They are free for the taking and don’t require any planting or weeding.  I love my Chanterelles.

CHANTERELLE SINGLE

CHANTERELLE SINGLE

 

Looks like rain again so I will go roll my car windows up and  cook some of my mushrooms.

 

Gordon

A HOT SPRING HAS NOT SLOWED OUR GARDEN!

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 04-06-2015

GARDEN REPORT What a pleasure it is to go to the garden.  It is still early and we are already picking rape and collards, sweet bell peppers and artichokes, tomatoes and cucumbers, radishes, lettuce and Swiss chard.  The “Kandy Korn”, okra and Brussels sprouts are looking good and promise to give us a good harvest as well as all the other thing we have planted.  Our sugar peas have given us three 4-lb pickings with more on the way.  We have just put in two varieties of bush beans as well as two varieties of pole beans. GARDEN HISTORY Our raised bed garden started as a 10 bed layout inside a fenced-in area within a larger fences area around the formal 3 acre  “English garden” (to discourage deer munching).  As time has passed, we expanded outside the initial area into the “English garden”.  Many of our readers will remember our placement of 5 long 25 foot raised beds to the north of the small garden (this area now holds our daylily garden – for eating).  We then built a 40 foot cage to protect our blackberry crop.  Next was another long 40 foot raised bed next to the east fence where the peas/beans/cherry tomatoes are growing today.  We then put in 5 rows of fig rootings that are well on their way to becoming our fig hedge as well as a new row (raised bed) of blackberry cane and blueberry plants that also grow our Kentucky wonder pole beans this year.   This winter I built a double raised bed that can be covered with a protective cloth to grow squash under to avoid the squash bore.  Scattered throughout the larger garden are other areas that we have converted into productive food areas like the bush cherry hedge, the pear and apple trees and the three olive trees.  We have 14 citrus trees within the garden (these are not producing any fruit this year due to the cold winter but have supplied us with abundant oranges, tangerines, grapefruit and lemons over many years). WHO ARE WE?

KATHY, DAVIS AND KAREN

KATHY, DAVIS AND KAREN

I am going to ask each of the 4 other members of our garden group to submit something about themselves for the next blog.  I know that they will comply as they know that I will write something about them if they don’t and they will have no control over what I will reveal.  Last week I was delighted to find three of our four in the garden at the same time.  That is rare because we sort of show up when we find the time and don’t need to have everyone present unless there is a major task to accomplish (like hauling dirt to a new bed). This has been a learning experience which has been very productive.  Every crop is not always successful but we make changes each year to improve our success.  This spring garden looks to be a very successful garden.

KATHY, GORDON AND KAREN

KATHY, GORDON AND KAREN

Other related activities are our three bee hives which were started to aid in garden pollination (however most of our bees  fly into the forest to gather the abundant nectar and pollen found there); the horses which give us a rich supply of compost as well as the accompanying earth worms; the chickens which we have increased by 12 this year to yield more fresh farm eggs (good big brown ones) and the chicken manure. We have enlarged the original fenced area from 10 raised beds to 16 (it is now full).  It is interesting to note that we do not grow our vegetables to save money but instead do so to have access to varieties that are not available in the grocery stores or are free of most pesticides.  We do occasionally use a mild insecticide like Sevin dust to control things like the cabbage butterfly but our crops are mostly insecticide free.  I tried to pick the butterfly worms off the Cole plants each day but I couldn’t stay ahead of the aggressive egg-laying skill of the butterfly.

KANDY KORN

KANDY KORN

PURPLE CABBAGE

PURPLE CABBAGE

THE NEW CUCUMBER - DIVA

THE NEW CUCUMBER – DIVA

ARTICHOKES I have never tasted fresh artichokes until this spring.  They are nothing like the vegetable that I find in the grocery store.  A fresh artichoke has a delicate, non-bitter flavor that goes into the stem portion of the bud.   I eat mine with garlic butter and will never get enough – sort of like my craving for blue crabs.  We have 12 plants in the garden and I will increase this next year.  Only one of our plants were old enough to produce artichokes this year but that will change next year.  Artichokes are not supposed to be perennial plants in zone 8 but ours survived the winter which hurt our citrus so I am encouraged that we might be able to count on a good crop next year.  In a nut shell – artichokes like water but don’t like to swim so the garden soil needs to be well drained.  They grow best in areas with mild  winters and cool foggy summers (like on the northern coast of California).  That is not happening here along the South Carolina coast where our summers can get close to 100 degrees and winter frost can go down to 5 degrees.  So what can we do to help the plant survive these extremes?  First we can plant them in partial sun (or partial shade).  After the final fall harvest we can cut the plants down to the ground and mulch with 4 inches of aged compost (this mulch is also recommended for the summer growth period to keep the roots cool and retain moisture).  This is a subtropical plant that will produce for 5 years before it needs to be replanted.  The small suckers at the base can be removed and planted elsewhere to increase the size of the crop or removed and discarded if one has enough artichoke plants.  It is important to feed the plants when they are growing fast.  I use fish oil but some don’t like the smell it gives the garden so any good balanced fertilizer will do (Miracle Grow).  Also use a liquid high potassium (potash) fertilizer during the growth period (every two weeks) to encourage bud formation.  It is recommended that the plants be spaced 4 feet apart but that will not work in the raised bed configuration so I plant mine on a 1 foot pattern and will prune to avoid overcrowding.  Good luck with your artichokes.  They are well worth the effort. I will discuss another vegetable that is seldom found in the southern garden which we are having good success with  in the next blog – rhubarb.

GARDEN PANORAMA

GARDEN PANORAMA

 

This is a lot of fun and very educational for all of us in the garden.  I love the fresh vegetables as well as the comradery we enjoy with ourselves and the expanded friends that visit us on the last Saturday in March to celebrate the Wisteria bloom….

 

BUT I MUST CONFESS THAT THE REAL REASON I GARDEN IS:

 

 

 

 

 

CAN YOU GUESS?

CAN YOU GUESS?

THIS IS A SUMMER DELIGHT

THIS IS A SUMMER DELIGHT

GOOD AGED COMPOST IS OUR SECRET!

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 04-05-2015

WE HAVE GATHERED VIRGIN TOP SOIL FROM THE FOREST, PURCHASED BAGS UPON BAGS OF MIRACLE GROW POTTING SOIL FROM LOWES, ADDED TONS OF OAK LEAVES AS MULCH WHICH WE LATER COMPOST AS WELL AS MIXED IN CHICKEN MANURE, BUT NOTHING HAS HAD THE EFFECT THAT OUR AGED HORSE MANURE HAS HAD.

Our two horses contribute 80 lbs of raw manure every day.  We gather, pile, turn it over, keep it moist and then apply it generously to the raised beds after 10 to 12 weeks of cooking.  We know it is ready when our indigenous earthworm population appears throughout the blend.   To say that we have to step back and let the garden grow is an understatement.  Things are doubling in size every 7 to 10 days.  We are harvesting lettuce, collards and rape as fast as we can and cannot stay ahead of it.  Cucumbers, squash, sugar peas, tomatoes, peppers and carrots are soon to follow and then everything else will start.

I am not complaining.  I have had a garden for 40 years and never seen anything like this.  I think it is the combination of the raised beds, deep oak leaf mulch and the properly aged and composted horse manure.

BEES

I was not able to capture either of the two bee swarms that emerged a couple weeks ago.  I have two swarm traps in the forest but the bees found better tree hollows elsewhere.  My son and I tried to physically capture the lowest swarm but we did not get the queen so they reassembled and flew off.  I am trying to get a good swarm into the top bar hive I built a couple years ago.  Once done, we will have four hives which will be enough to satisfy our honey and pollination needs.

CHICKENS

I will pick up 12 new pullets tomorrow.  Three of each:  Silver Wyandotte, Colombian Wyandotte, Welsummer and Cookoo Maran.  All brown egg layers.  That will give us a total of 16 hens and two roosters.  NOTE:  The Columbian Wyandotte did not come in so I doubled the number of Silver Wyandottes to 6.

VEGETABLES AND FRUIT

Both the blackberries and the blue berries are set and filling out.  The figs and pears are starting to show but the citrus is not having a heavy bloom.  In fact, some of the trees are not blooming at all.  The tangerine are showing the best recovery from the winter cold.  I planted 7 new plum trees (all different varieties) this spring so that we can enjoy a plum harvest.  I cannot get peaches to grow here nor can I get grapes (other than our slip skin varieties) to live longer than a couple years.  The apples are a disappointment so I guess we will have to settle on what we can grow.

I have decided that I wanted to try to grow super sweet corn this year.  I have avoided growing it because it attracts raccoons which will go after more than just the corn.  I will fence the raised bed with chicken wire and liven up the electric fence which charges the inner fence around the garden.  We will see.

Lots of other things going on but I will save them for later.

Here are some of the photos of the garden…

BLACKBERRIES P1330060 CELEBRITY TOMATO BLOOM P1330036 EARLY APRIL GARDEN P1320539 EARLY APRIL GARDEN PHOTO 2 P1320652 FIG HEDGE P1330063 FIVE WEEK OLD GARDEN P1330031 OUR FIRST ARTICHOKE P1330040 PEAS P1330051

rape - a cooking green that we also use as a green salad

rape – a cooking green that we also use as a green salad

REDTIP IN BLOOM P1320547 SNOWBALL VERBURNIUM IN BLOOM P1320548 SQUASH TUBES P1330058 WISTERIA AFTER THE BLOOM P1320549 YOUNG CELEBRITY TOMATO P1330035

I was going to add the 14 photos one at a time and put a caption under each but word press added them all at once so I will try to caption them now.

Photo one is of our early blackberry set.  We have a moderate crop this year.  I did not water the canes enough last summer and they are weak and will not produce an abundant crop this year.  I will learn from this and pour the water on them after they finish producing.

Photo two is the tomato bloom which promises to give us a lot of tomatoes.  I am growing the Celebrity variety this year because it is supposed to be the best one to grow here in South Carolina and it is resistant to most tomato pest.  Photo number 14 is of a new set Celebrity tomato.  I have also started 24 cherry tomato plants of 4 varieties and have placed them in the garden.  They are 1 1/2 foot high and will give us an explosion of little tomatoes.  In addition to these two, we have 6 Roma and 6 Cherokee Purple plants.

Photos 3 and 4 are of the garden in early April.  Compare it to photo 6 which was taken 3 weeks later.  It has got to be the horse compost.

Photo 5 is of a fig plant in the fig hedge which should be ready to prune next year.  Remember that I am going to trim it to 4 feet high and 4 feet wide so we can harvest the figs from both sides of the hedges without using a ladder.

Photo seven is our first artichoke.  We now have 12 plants which will produce 3 or 4 chokes each next year.

Photo eight is of our sugar snap peas.  They started blooming yesterday so we should start harvesting in a week.  What a sweet pleasure they are to eat in the garden.  I have to force myself to take some to the kitchen.  (By-the-way, no asparagus gets to the kitchen).

Photo nine is our crop of rape which is very tender and has just a hint of fire so it blends with the lettuce very well.  It is primarily a cooking green but I like it fresh.

Then we have photos 10: flowering red tip, 11: flowering snowball Viburnum, and 13 which is the wisteria arbor two weeks after the soiree without a bloom.

Photograph 12 is of our squash tubes.  We cannot grow squash here because the squash bore (a moth) destroys the vines just before they start to produce so I found a parthenogenic zucchini squash that is self pollinating and can be grown under a cover.  If this works, we will have all the squash we want.

Last but not least, we are mulching the beds and the walkways with live oak leaves to inhibit weed growth.  It has worked well in the past.  All areas now are getting ample water coverage so are ready to start enjoying our harvest.

We have several new members this month.  I welcome you all. 

Gordon

 

5TH ANNUAL WISTERIA SOIREE WAS THE BEST YET!

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Posted by Gordon | Posted in News | Posted on 10-04-2015

Sorry it has taken me two weeks to report on the soiree but the demands of getting the garden in have been very pleasurable though time consuming.  What a great gathering we had this year.  Thirty gardeners showed up and enjoyed the Frogmore stew and steamed blue crabs under the wisteria.  The weather was perfect and the midges did not get the invitation in time but one of our swarm of bees showed up and gathered above us.  The wisteria arbor was at its peak in all its glory.

I am pleased to announce that a couple new members joined our team and will help us immensely in our gardening choirs.

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

 

 

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

When you get two economics professors together ...

When you get two economics professors together …

 

 

 

 

bee swarm

bee swarm

5th annual wisteria soiree

5th annual wisteria soiree

 

The late group photo - only half remained.

The late group photo – only half remained.

 

I will continue our garden progress in the next blog.

 

Gordon